CodeDateVenueEarly Bird FeeFee
PWR102217 - 20 May 2021Virtual Instructor Led Training (VILT) SGD 2,250 SGD 2,450 Remind me of Course Dates
PWR102217 - 20 May 2021Virtual Instructor Led Training (VILT) USD 1,642 USD 1,788 Remind me of Course Dates

Code

PWR1022

Date

17 - 20 May 2021

Venue

Virtual Instructor Led Training (VILT)

Early Bird Fee

SGD 2,250

Fee

SGD 2,450

Code

PWR1022

Date

17 - 20 May 2021

Venue

Virtual Instructor Led Training (VILT)

Early Bird Fee

USD 1,642

Fee

USD 1,788

About this Virtual Instructor Led Training (VILT) 

Forward pricing and valuation in electricity generation is a 4 half day intensive, technical hands-on course in which attendees receive comprehensive instruction on the theory and practice of making price forecasts and assessing risk in the electricity generating industry. After a discussion of electricity markets around the world, the course moves to programming and model structuring, where attendees follow the lead of the instructor in building various analyzes of forward pricing and and valuation issues.

  • Learn practical tools to analyse a host of issues in electricity analysis including efficient tools to work with supply and demand data; creating flexible scenario and sensitivity analysis to evaluate power prices and marginal costs; effectively presenting short-term and long-term supply and curves; development of hydro analysis; Monte Carlo simulation and other issues.
  • Create demand and supply models of electricity pricing that incorporates changes in fuel prices, new capacity, demand profiles, maintenance outages to measure hourly marginal cost and total generation cost.
  • Study the structure of market designs around the world and simulate pricing strategies through evaluation of the California crisis and simulation exercises.
  • Understand the relationship between capacity pricing, reliability, loss of load probability and reserve margins through extending the short-run supply and demand analysis and modelling outage cost with different capacity configurations.
  • Model the economic value of different types of renewable resources in alternative markets including storage hydro, run-of-river hydro, wind and solar.
  • Develop efficient ways to quickly compute the levelised electricity cost of different technologies using carrying charge factors and alternative financial models and use levelised cost analysis to develop screening models of optimal resources.
  • Evaluate long-run marginal cost of electricity cost through simulating the value of different generating resources given load curves and simulate the effects of different capital costs, heat rates and fuel prices on the long-run marginal cost.
  • Compute the effects of start-up costs, heat rate curves, and transmission constraints on the value of alternative plants and the price of electricity.

The VILT will be delivered online in 4 sessions comprising 4 hours per day, with 2 breaks of 10 minutes per day, including time for lectures, discussion, quizzes and short classroom exercises.

Additionally, some self-study will be requested. Participants are invited but not obliged to bring a short presentation (10 mins max) on a practical problem they encountered in their work. This will then be explained and discussed during the VILT. A short test or quiz will be held at the end the course.

Our key course expert provides financial and economic consulting services to a variety of clients, he teaches professional development courses in an assortment of modelling topics (project finance, M&A, and energy). He is passionate about teaching in Africa, South America, Asia and Europe. Many of the unique analytical concepts and modelling techniques he has developed have arisen from discussion with participants in his courses. He has taught customized courses for MIT’s Sloan Business School, Bank Paribas, Shell Oil, Society General, General Electric, HSBC, GDF Suez, Citibank, CIMB, Lind Lakers, Saudi Aramco and many other energy and industrial clients.

His consulting activities include developing complex project finance, corporate and simulation models, providing expert testimony on financial and economic issues before energy regulatory agencies, and advisory services to support merger and acquisition projects.

Our key course expert has written a textbook titled Corporate and Project Finance Modelling, Theory and Practice published by Wiley Finance. The book introduces unique modelling techniques that address many complex issues that are not typically used by even the most experienced financial analysts. For example, it describes how to build user-defined functions to solve circular logic without cumbersome copy and paste macros; how to write function that derives the ratio of EV/EBITDA accounting for asset life, historical growth, taxes, return on investment, and cost of capital; and how to efficiently solve many project finance issues related to debt structuring. He is in the process of writing a second book that describes a series of
valuation and analytical mistakes made in finance. This book uses many case studies from Harvard
Business School that were thought to represent effective business strategies and later turned into valuation nightmares.

Over the course of his career our key course expert has been involved in formulating
significant government policy related to electricity deregulation; he has prepared models and analyses for many clients around the world; he has evaluated energy purchasing decisions for many corporations; and, he has provided advice on corporate strategy. His projects include development of a biomass plant, analysis and advisory work for purchase of electricity generation, distribution and transmission assets by the City of Chicago, formulation of rate policy for major metro systems and street lighting networks, advocacy testimony on behalf of low income consumers, risk analysis for toll roads, and evaluation of solar and wind projects. He has constructed many advisory analyses for project finance and merger and acquisition transactions.

Lastly, our key course expert was formerly Vice President at the First National Bank of Chicago where he directed analysis of energy loans and also created financial modelling techniques used in advisory projects. He received an MBA specializing in econometrics (with honours) from the University of Chicago and a BSc in Finance from the University of Illinois (with highest university honours).